Unit 5: The War of 1812

We have independence & a solid constitution . . . .

now what?

Prior to the War of 1812, America's leaders were adjusting to the birth of the American political system. As you introduce this unit to your students, make sure they comprehend the importance of who was chosen to be the first president of the United States. Our forefathers understood how imperative this decision would be because the first president would set the precedent for all the ones who would follow. They were also aware that the new president needed to be wise, honest, and strong in order to lead the infant nation.

Many men were considered, but when it was all said and done, the only person who seemed perfect for the job was the same man who led the Continental Army to victory during the Battle of Trenton when the Hessians were invaded.

It was decided unanimously that the first president of the United States would be General George Washington. George Washington’s term as president of the new country was not easy and he chose not to run for any future terms. Two different political views emerged and with it the birth of American politics as we know it today.

Back then, they were called the Jeffersonian Republicans and the Federalists but later came to be known as simply the Republicans and the Democrats, respectively.

Those first years were bumpy with lots of arguments, debates, and disagreements between the forefathers. Thanks to the constitution that they had created and signed, the basic principals remained strong and in tact and thus began the foundations of democracy that the rest of the world would envy and strive to imitate. It is definitely something that every American should be proud of!

Shortly after the turn of the eighteenth century, America found itself embroiled in disputes with Great Britain once again. The War of 1812 was the first time America would fight as an independent nation. The resulting victory would boost our morale and patriotism, especially because our national anthem was born during the war. On a ship docked in Boston harbor, held captive by the British, Frances Scott Key wrote the lyrics of The Star Spangled Banner.

In this unit, you will find a primary source activity. Primary sources are an outstanding way to reach your students because they are like pulling back the curtains of history and taking a glimpse: the voices and faces of the past come to life.

Important key terms designed to introduce your students to the new unit.

Please come back soon; a PowerPoint on this unit will be uploaded as soon as possible.

A complete set of Fill-in-the-Notes for unit 5 arriving soon.

An engaging multimedia project in which students choose from a list of topics in the unit.

A primary source activity on the War of 1812.

This assignment illustrates the differences and similarities of our nation's first political parties: the Federalists & the Republicans.

A study guide to prepare students for the test; I always make mine a mandatory assignment. It's been proven in my classes time and time again: if students complete the entire study guide, they do well on the test.

All of the tests on OwlTeacher.com are a mix of term matching, multiple choice, and information recall with short answer questions and essay questions. The essay questions demand students to put important elements of the unit into their own words, showing thorough understanding.

Return from the War of 1812 to American History


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